Browse "Architectural Landmarks"

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24 Sussex Drive

24 Sussex Drive, in Ottawa, was designated as the official residence of the prime minister of Canada in 1950 and, in 1951, Louis St-Laurent became the first prime minister to live in the house. It was designed by J.M. Currier

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Balmoral Grist Mill

Balmoral Grist Mill in Balmoral Mills, NS, was built in about 1874 by Alexander MacKay. The mill is located on Matheson's Brook and was once just one of 5 mills on the brook. It was used to grind local stocks of wheat, oats, barley, rye and buckwheat to produce flour and oatmeal.

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Banff Springs Hotel

The hotel was developed as part of the CPR’s (Canadian Pacific Railway) network of hotels, which built landmark hotels in young cities across Canada in order to encourage the use of its transcontinental lines. The Banff Springs Hotel is in the lineage of hotels such as the Chateau Lake Louise in Alberta, Le Chateau Frontenac in Québec City and the Empress Hotel in Victoria, British Columbia. Known as the “Castle in the Rockies,” the Banff Springs Hotel is predominantly in the Scottish Baronial style, featuring an Arts-and-Crafts interior.

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Barns

Barns, like certain of our native birds and animals, have joined the ranks of "endangered species." No funds from wealthy societies, heritage trusts or governments are spent on the purchase and preservation of our oldest barns, and their demise can be expected.

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Basilica of St John the Baptist

Visible from everywhere in St. John's, Newfoundland, and, so important in the 19th century, the most striking building as one entered the harbour, the Basilica of St. John the Baptist was built to assert the place and power of Newfoundland's Irish Catholic population.

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Brock's Monument, Queenston Heights

The monument to Sir Isaac Brock stands atop Ontario’s Niagara Escarpment at Queenston Heights, overlooking the lower Niagara River. The current monument is the second erected in Canada to honour Brock, a military commander who died during the Battle of Queenston Heights in the War of 1812.

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Canada House

Canada House, a distinctive symbol of Canadian interests in Britain, located in London's bustling Trafalgar Square.

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Chateau Lake Louise

Chateau Lake Louise is a world-renowned mountain resort and UNESCO World Heritage Site located in Banff National Park, Alberta. Known as the “Diamond in the Wilderness,” the chateau was built beginning in the late 1800s, and was developed as part of the CPR’s network of hotels. It shares a lineage with the Banff Springs Hotel, Le Chateau Frontenac in Québec City and the Empress Hotel in Victoria. Considering its remote location and its eventual scale, the Chateau Lake Louise marked an important point in the development of the Canadian West.

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Château Frontenac

Built by Canadian Pacific beginning in 1892, and designed by architect Bruce Price, the Château Frontenac is an excellent example of château-style hotels developed by railway companies in Canada.

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Condominium

Owners in a condominium project are responsible for all expenses relating to their own individual unit, but in addition the condominium owners must pay their share of the expenses relating to the common areas.

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Eaton Centre

The Eaton Centre, Toronto (designed by the Zeidler Partnership and Bregman and Hamann, phase 1 opening in 1977, phase 2 in 1979) is the epitome of those vast multistorey interior "atrium" spaces for which Canadian architecture became known internationally in the 1970s. The centre comprises The T.

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Fortification

Although the barrier posed by these walls was sometimes increased by setting a ditch below their outer faces, fortification did not progress beyond this rather simple conception until the 16th century.

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Habitat 67

Habitat 67 is an experimental urban residential complex designed by Israeli-born architect Moshe Safdie and located in the Cité du Havre neighbourhood south of Montréal’s Old Port sector. Commissioned by the Canadian Corporation for Expo 67, the project derives its name from the theme of the fair, “Man and His World,” and became one of the major pavilions of the exhibition. It is the only remaining structure from Expo 67 to retain its original function. In 2015, the Guardian called Habitat “a functioning icon of 1960s utopianism, and one of that period’s most important buildings.”

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Hart House

Hart House's facilities include the Great Hall located in the East Wing which functions as an event venue, conference centre, and concert hall and houses a Steinway grand piano. The Music Room in the West Wing also boasts a grand piano, and is used for smaller concerts, lectures and events.

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Hart House

Hart House, on UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO campus, was designed by the architectural firm of SPROATT AND ROLPH and was built 1911-19. Soldier's Tower, a memorial to the university's WWI dead, was added in 1924. Endowed by the Massey

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House of Commons

The House of Commons is the centre of political power in Canada. The prime minister and his Cabinet receive their authority through the confidence of the House. It is an institution steeped in tradition and history.

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Lighthouses

Before the automation of lighthouses, the duties of lighthouse keepers included the traditional "keeping of the light," maintaining radio communications and beacons, tending fog alarms and providing rescue services and sanctuary.

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Massey Hall

Known as “Canada’s Carnegie Hall,” Massey Hall is Canada’s oldest and most venerated concert hall. It opened in 1894 and was the home of the Toronto Symphony Orchestra and the Toronto Mendelssohn Choir until 1982. The site of many historic events and performances, it has been repeatedly voted Canada’s Best Live Music Venue Over 1,500 Seats and Venue of the Year by Canadian music industry associations. It is a National Historic Site and a heritage site in the City of Toronto. It will be closed for two years as of 2 July 2018 to allow for a $142-million renovation.